OPTIONS requests

When I published the Costs to Expect API I was initially bemused, none of my OPTIONS requests worked, they all return “405 method not allowed”.

After searching, I diagnosed the problem. The HTTP OPTIONS request fails because the default PHP-CGI handler does not handle the “OPTIONS” verb.

The fix is simple, update or add the handler in web.config.

<handlers>
<remove name=”PHP72_via_FastCGI” />
<add name=”PHP72_via_FastCGI” path=”*.php” verb=”GET,PUT,POST,DELETE,HEAD,OPTIONS” modules=”FastCgiModule” scriptProcessor=”PATH\To\File\php-cgi.exe” resourceType=”Either” requireAccess=”Script” />
</handlers>

Reduced development time :(

As I have mentioned before, I’m lucky enough to be able to take time off during the year to work on my projects, every time I take on a new contract my schedule goes out of whack.

When I’m not contracting, outside of real life commitments, I try to dedicate as many as 30hrs per week to work on my projects, when I’m contracting that isn’t possible, a 40hr week with travel doesn’t leave much free time.

The last two weeks have been an adjustment, I managed to log 5.5hrs the first week and 7.5hrs the second week, I’m on track for 10hrs this week.

Is this a real problem, no, the first world called and wants a tissue, the issue is expectations, during my summer of I steamed through my work, with reality hitting, productivity takes a nosedive. Eventually, Pivotal Tracker will update to show more accurate completion times; once I’m three sprints in, until then, it is frustrating looking at completion dates that are optimistic.

Why am I blogging about this? As the site byline says, I was musing.

Releasing…works

I have a long-term project, Dlayer, that I very much believe in, but after many false starts, it still doesn’t exist, it will though, I’m due to restart it later this year with a slightly different focus 🙂

Why did I never finish or release the project? I never managed to hit what I considered to be the minimum viable product (MVP), my idea of the MVP for Dlayer was too vast, and far too much for one developer, I never managed to get enough done.

Early last year I needed to develop a small library, my PHP Quill renderer, I developed just what I needed at the time and quickly released it, within six months I bumped it to v1.00. I knocked it to v1.00 because I was confident in the library, it had warts, but people seemed to be using it, it wasn’t just solving my personal problem.

I’m not suggesting tagging it with a v1.00 release number made it slightly popular, I’m saying that because I was confident enough to add the v1.00 release number it became more popular.

Tagging the library with v1.00 meant I had to handle it differently, I needed to ensure the README and CHANGELOG were accurate, and up to date, tests are required, and I needed to learn how to handle the pull requests I started receiving. All of this made the library better, as I’ve said in the past, nothing makes your code better than knowing there is a minuscule chance other developers will look at your library.

During the summer I released two apps, both v1.00, the REST API for Costs to Expect and the companion Web app. Neither of these apps is complete. The REST API is missing quite a few features; however, it supports enough to get the job done, replace my spreadsheet and allow my wife to submit data.

I’m not saying anything new; there is a blog post by Jeff Atwood referencing a blog post by Chuck Jazdzewski stating our job is to ship. Knowing that is one thing, doing it is another, I wish I had had the confidence to ship earlier, and I hope I keep it up.

Costs to Expect API

The Costs to Expect API is ready for release*.

I’m going to continue development to add additional features and start working on the summary endpoints and endpoints required for the companion website, however, the API itself could be released today.

The API is ready, five years and two months of child costs exist, the two need to be put together.

I’m going to work with my Wife to review and categorise the data. Our data is categorised, however, for the API we want to break the data down a little more, our data is split into thirteen categories, we intend to have fewer base categories and subcategories to provide the detail.

*I’m not setting a release date, it will be soon though, I want to get the API out before I look for a new contract and go back to work.

Once the API is out, I will start development on the companion website for data input (preview for iOS app), the iOS app and the website to display the data.

We have several long-term plans for the Costs to Expect API and website, one being to allow additional data, for example, localised costs for childcare/hobbies etc. Our intention is you will be able to augment our base data to get a more accurate idea.

Summer off, what does off really mean?

As a contract developer, I’m lucky enough to have I have the luxury of choosing when not to work, I’ve just finished a six-month contract and rather than find a new contract immediately I am taking the summer off to work on my projects.

I have many personal projects, the big one that dates back years and then lots of small projects, one of which has become far more popular than I ever expected and is keeping me busy.

What does a summer off mean?

Outside of social and family commitments, it means I have a bit more time to focus on my projects. I always manage to find time to work on my projects, being a night owl, but it is nice to have the extra time, makes it easier to solve the more significant problems that you can’t entirely get your head around when you only have a couple of hours at the end of a long day.

In no particular order, I am going to support and improve my open source projects, learn Swift, write a simple app to interface with a RESTful API, develop the API and if I get time, work on my long-term project and do some charting and graphing work for a new website.

The above is a tall order for six to eight weeks; we will see in September/October how far I got.

Open Source is awesome, PHP Quill Renderer v3.01.0

A few hours after arriving at work I got an email from GitHub letting me know about a posted issue on one of my Open Source libraries, turns out I had missed a couple of things in my testing.

When I create a library, I have a use case in mind; typically I’m trying to solve a problem specific to one of my projects, having an extra set of eyes reviewing my libraries and using them differently is terrific.

I’m always happy to receive bug reports; each fix improves the library. Hopefully, there will not be too many more but if there are I will jump on them to fix the issue.

I have released v3.01.0 of my PHP Quill Renderer; Parser::load() wasn’t resetting the deltas array, and the Compound delta was incorrectly trying to handle images with multiple attributes assigned.

PHP Quill Renderer v3.00.0

I have released v3.00.0 of my PHP Quill renderer; the rewrite only took three weeks, I expected it to take a little longer, but once I put fingers to keyboard, it came together very quickly.

I had a significant head start when I started the rewrite, I had the design down on paper, and I had the unit tests from v2.03.1, it can never be over-stated, when your library has good test coverage working on an almost complete rewrite is a joy.

I’m hoping v3.00.0 will be well received; I’ve had more emails than I would have expected from other developers asking for progress, raising bugs and thanking me, developers appear to be using it.

The new design is much more flexible than v2.03.1; it should make it simple for me to support the rest of the features in Quill without continually adding hacks, a colleague at work helped pushed me in the right direction.

I now need to work on the v3.01.0 release to tidy up a few issues and then create a simple demo site to show live use; the one-page website will display a Quill editor, the delta after submission and the output in the requested format as well as the PHP code itself.

v3.00.0 supports all the features present in v2.03.1; it fixes the issue with paragraphs sitting next to lists and paragraphs being ignored and includes additional test coverage.

Row and column view helpers

Over the weekend I released updates to three of my libraries, Zend Framework 3 view helpers has been bumped to v1.02.1, Zend Framework 3 view helpers code completion is now v1.07.0, and Bootstrap 4 helpers is now at v0.04.

I added row and column view helpers to the Zf3 view helpers library, the other libraries have been updated to include the new additions.

For an overview of all my libraries, visit Transmute-Coffee.com, to get the code, go to GitHub.

Library updates

I’ve just pushed three library updates, the Bootstrap 4 helpers library is now at v0.03, the Zend Framework 3 view helpers library is at v1.01 and the sister library which provides code completion is now at v1.06.

I’m slowly adding support for additional Bootstrap components, this time the alert component, details and links can be found at Transmute Coffee.

Dlayer, vNext

This is a cross post from the Dlayer.com blog, it is relevant here because their is a good chance I will be releasing new open source libraries related to the tools development.

Development work on Dlayer vNext is deliberately slow; I’m attempting to ensure that any and all of the core architecture issues I noticed developing version 1 get resolved.

I spent a considerable amount of time on the UI and UX for version 1 of Dlayer, very little of that will change for vNext. My issues with version 1 can be summed up in one word, modular, as in, the app wasn’t.

There are two parts to the problem; the designers were not modular, in Zend Framework 1 (modules were a bit of a hack), and two, the tools were not plug-and-play.

Modules

This one is easy, by switching to Zend Framework 3, and being careful as I develop, the modules can behave as real modules, turn them on or off, transfer to different apps, all possible

Plug-and-play

The tools in version 1 of Dlayer had too many hooks into the system; they could be disabled dynamically, but you could not drop a tool into another module or quickly remove the code for a disabled tool.

On paper, I have a new plan; and I am in the middle of prototyping to see if it solves the core issues.

The solution is complicated; it will take time to develop examples of each tool type. However, as soon as I am sure the design is right, it simplifies the rest of the app.

Simpler app

The tools in version 1 were solely data management within the designers, in vNext, this changes.

The tools in vNext are responsible for everything relating to the content item, including, how the content is displayed in the WYSIWYG designer. The app at this point is merely a vehicle to provide access to the tools.